With good judgment, little else matters. Without it, nothing else matters.


By Joe Campbell
November 30th, 2007

[digg-reddit-me]The Wall Street Journal had an editorial this past Thursday by Warren Bennis, a professor of business at the University of Southern California and Noel Tichy, a professor of business at the University of Michigan and co-authors of Judgment: How Winning Leaders Make Great Calls which was published earlier this month. In exploring the theme of experience versus judgment, they came down on the side of judgment (link behind subscriber firewall):

Where do we put our money? First, let us cite Ted Sorenson, one of John F. Kennedy’s closest advisers and speechwriters. When asked about his former boss’s judgment, Mr. Sorenson responded, “I cannot emphasize how important that elusive quality is; far more important than organization, structure, procedures and machinery. These are all important, yes, but nothing compared to judgment.”

After a five-year study of leadership covering virtually all sectors of American life, we came to the inescapable conclusion that judgment regularly trumps experience. Our central finding is that judgment is the core, the nucleus of exemplary leadership. With good judgment, little else matters. Without it, nothing else matters…

Judgment isn’t quite an unnatural act, but it also doesn’t come naturally…

Yes, Mrs. Clinton, experience is not without value. But judgment, fed by solid character, should determine the choice of our next president. [my emphasis]

UPDATED: Article no longer behind the firewall. It’s worth reading in full.

UPDATED, finally: Article is actually behind the firewall. Sorry for the mix-ups.

 

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