A brighter day will come


By Joe Campbell
September 29th, 2008

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check this site out Yesterday, Obama used the storm that accompanied an Obama-Biden rally as a metaphor for these times (continued with sourced remarks he has said before and might have said in that storm as I can’t find the full transcript):

Sometimes the skies look cloudy and it’s dark. And you think the rains will never pass. The young people understand that the clouds – these too will pass, that a brighter day will come.1 In these tough times, it is that American spirit, that American promise, that pushes us forward. Even when the path is uncertain. It binds us together in spite of our differences. It makes us fix our eye not on what is seen, but what is unseen, that better place around the bend.2

If the last few months have taught us anything, it’s that we can all suffer from the excesses of a few. It has taught us that we all have a stake in each other’s success. We all have a stake in ensuring that the market is efficient and transparent; that it inspires trust and confidence; that it rewards those who are truly successful instead of those who are just successful at gaming the system.

I realize that there are some who will say that achieving all of this is far too difficult. That it is too hard to build consensus. That we are too divided and self-interested to think about the responsibilities we have to each other and to our country. That the times are simply too tough.

But then I am reminded that we have been in tougher times and we have faced far more difficult challenges. And each time we have emerged stronger, more united, and more prosperous than the last. It is faith in the American ideal that carries us through, as well as the belief that was voiced by Franklin Roosevelt all those years ago this week: “Failure is not an American habit; and in the strength of great hope we must all shoulder our common load.” That is the strength and the hope we seek both today – and in all the days and months to come.3

In our country, I have found that this cooperation happens not because we agree on everything, but because behind all the labels and false divisions and categories that define us; beyond all the petty bickering and point-scoring in Washington, Americans are a decent, generous, compassionate people, united by common challenges and common hopes. And every so often, there are moments which call on that fundamental goodness to make this country great again.

So it was for that band of patriots who declared in a Philadelphia hall the formation of a more perfect union; and for all those who gave on the fields of Gettysburg and Antietam their last full measure of devotion to save that same union.

So it was for the Greatest Generation that conquered fear itself, and liberated a continent from tyranny, and made this country home to untold opportunity and prosperity.

So it was for the workers who stood out on the picket lines; the women who shattered glass ceilings; the children who braved a Selma bridge for freedom’s cause.

So it has been for every generation that faced down the greatest challenges and the most improbable odds to leave their children a world that’s better, and kinder, and more just.

And so it must be for us.

America, this is our moment. This is our time. Our time to turn the page on the policies of the past. Our time to bring new energy and new ideas to the challenges we face. Our time to offer a new direction for the country we love.4

  1. From this speech. []
  2. From this speech. []
  3. From this speech. []
  4. From this speech. []